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Lloyd's of London online rally - Safer spaces agreement

Lloyd's of London online rally - Safer spaces agreement

We welcome everyone, regardless of life or organising experiences, in this space. We believe each of us has something to contribute to the struggle for climate justice, and much to learn from others.

We are committed to creating a space where everyone is treated as equal, and people are not afraid to speak, ask for questions, and contribute to discussions. We seek to see our differences as just that, differences not ways to drive us apart.

We define oppression as any behaviour that demeans, marginalises, threatens or harms anybody. We collectively commit to challenging it, whether it shows up in language, or actions. If anyone were to display such behaviour towards others, the organisers will take a course of action discussed between them and those who have suffered from the behaviour. This might include talking to the perpetrator, soliciting an apology, or - in some scenarios - asking the perpetrator to leave the space.

We are aware of the range of different identities that people might bring to this space, including - but not limited to - genders, races, religious, classes, sexualities, abilities. We don’t make assumptions about people. This is a trans-inclusive space, and we respect people’s chosen use of pronouns. If you are unsure about people’s names or pronouns, ask, offering yours.

In particular, we take into account these principles:

Consent. We do not assume that our own physical or emotional boundaries are the same as someone else’s. Ask for explicit consent before talking about sensitive topics.

Be aware of your own privileges. Societies has raised us with hidden hierarchies, which play up in organising spaces. Actively challenge them. Be aware of how much space you are taking, and who you are excluding as a consequence.

Calling out. If you are being called out because of your behaviour, listen and reflect, even though your first reaction might be of defending yourself.

Learning. Ask if you don’t understand something, but don’t expect an immediate explanation. Don’t assume that people with lived experiences of oppression will answer you. You might be redirected to a resource, such as a book or a website. We all have responsibility to do our own learning, and if able to, talk about it with others.

Labour. We are all expected to contribute something to our struggle. It is ok to make mistakes, and to ask for help if needed. Thank people for the work they have done. Also consider what tasks you are taking up, and why - those can be reflective of your privilege. For example, it is a societal expectation that women do housework, which can reflect into women taking up more tasks such as cleaning, or cooking.

Security. Take into account that online organising spaces are not safe. During physical gatherings, we cannot guarantee the absence of journalists, or even undercover police officers. Don’t talk about something that could put you or other people at risk of harm.

Community accountability. We are all accountable for respecting these principles. If you notice something in breach of this policy, raise it with the safer spaces policy rep: daniel@coalaction.org.uk

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